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House Flipping is Strong in Today’s Market

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 Just yesterday - almost literally, the news was that House Flipping is Down.  Now, the news is that House Flipping is strong! What gives? 

After reading an article published by Housing Wire, and written by Jessica Guerin, I want to share with you the statistics show that house flipping is strong again.  The number of homes flipped in America is approaching its high of 2006, just before the crash.

The latest data from CoreLogic reveals that 10.9% of all home sales in the fourth quarter of 2018 were flips, or homes that have been occupied for two years or less. This is the highest rate since the housing bubble days of 2006, when flips comprised 11.4% of home sales. (See chart below)

 

House Flipping accounts for close to 15% of the current home sales in America

The overzealous speculation of house flippers in the months leading up to the crisis is often cited as a contributing factor to the housing bubble. So should we be worried now that houses built on spec appear to be making a comeback?

No, says CoreLogic, citing evidence suggesting that the business practices of flipping is far better than what it used to be. Flippers are much more educated today, then they were 13 years ago. Instead of flipping homes based solely on price speculation, investors are flipping with a focus on adding real value to properties. Read More...


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Property Flipping Down 12%

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Property Flipping Down 12%

If you are a house flipper, you may be feeling the pull of a shift in the business. Then again, you may be rising above the challenges in the house flipping market.  Nation-wide, it appears, the house flipping market is getting tougher, not just in Eugene/Springfield Oregon.

According to ATTOM Data Solutions (a leading provider of property data - providing access to nationwide real estate and property data for more than 155 million U.S. properties), a total of 45,901 single family homes and condos were flipped in the 3rd quarter of 2018. Those numbers indicate that flipping was down 12% from a year ago and a 3.5 year low. According to the chart below, the downward trend started about 12 months ago. Read More...


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Legislative Update

Utah Real Estate Investors Association

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Seller Finance:The Seller Finance Coalition has moved its focus to the US Senate with an advocacy campaign requesting Senators to incorporate HR 1360 language into S 2155. Please be sure to send your email advocacy through National REIA's Action Center (on NREIA's website, under the legislative tab). There is a pre-drafted letter is for your convenience.
HUD Lead law update:On August 10, 2017 HUD issued a notice updating its Lead Safe Housing Rule (LSHR). This rule impacts all Public Housing Authorities, Project Based Properties, AND Housing Choice Vouchers, i.e. Section 8 vouchers. The rule increases the responsibilities of property owners who accept vouchers. Be sure to reach out to the Housing Authority to make sure that if you accept a voucher holder, you are working under the most up to date rules for notification and maintenance.
Tax Reform:Tax reform has started! The initial wave of tax reform has been passed, and as National REIA has pointed out there are positives and concerns. I won't say negatives yet, because we have to wait for the regulatory onslaught that is already underway by the IRS in "clarifying" what the House and Senate meant. One of the key areas we are focused on is the definition of full time job versus part time efforts. The designation or distinction could result in the awarding or loss of a 20% tax break for Pass-through entities like LLCs.
Housing Reform:the next wave of welfare reform is percolating in Washington DC and the focus is on limits to generational housing and unlimited housing for the able-bodied. With the economy moving and jobs-aplenty, the Republicans in Congress are ready for another bite at the apple of reform. Needless to say this will be neither quiet nor quick. As yet, only a few key principles such as 5-year limits to subsidized housing have been leaked out. There will be a lot more on this issue once the budget is actually passed and IF the GOP believes it will help them in the mid-term election.
Energy Benchmarking:LEEDs programs have taken on a new life of their own - not just as incentives for developers, but as a standard of efficiency by local elected officials appealing to their green constituents. Energy efficiency is a good thing, but there is a cost/benefit factor that needs to be considered, and that has been over-ridden by the folks claiming the earth is growing hotter, oops, no colder, oops climate change. Well the weather is changing, but in the Midwest where common sense still resides, we call it the Seasons. Needless to say, many of these efforts are on the coasts. There are alternatives to LEED and many are much more pragmatic. Consider Green Globes and Energy Star as examples. In fact, Chicago IL is considering an energy rating system which would require all buildings to have an energy benchmarking - with an Energy Star© system that is under re-evaluation and may be changing its own system. Benchmarking has its set of problems, and while adherents support the process as transparent, the unintended consequences may be decreased property values over and above the cost of the utilities involved.
Rent Control:California may be facing a rent control-style program to its ballot process by a group evolved from ACORN. Several Cities are also considering implementing similar plans. Ironically, even Bloomberg News is reporting on the ineffectiveness of Rent Control! (see article on Real Estate Investing Today.com) Additionally, California property owners are working through the impossible task of "proving the negative" by showing that they no longer have bed bugs if a unit was found to have them by a prior resident.
Inclusionary Zoning Requirements: numerous cities like Philadelphia, have been working on approving new zoning mandates for mixed income housing.
Evictions:Are the hottest issue to "address" by municipalities. The book "Eviction," has set the stage for an argument for making it more difficult to evict a resident. Yes, even if they have wasted their income, or spent their money on drugs - as repeatedly documented in the book, and lied to their landlord, repeatedly... somehow the accountability aspect of paying a bill, i.e. rent, should now be more difficult to enforce. Read the book. Be aware. Be ready for it to come to a community near you! One argument to make is to ask that rental contracts be handled similar to other installment payment agreements, like auto and home loans. If those are worthy of being broken, then the rent payment can as well...
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Multiple Offers Strategies

Minnesota Real Estate Investors Association, Inc.

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When it comes to making offers, most investors only know how to make one offer at a time.  They usually make an all cash offer, also known as the MAO (Maximum Allowable Offer) or they get a loan from a bank, hard money lender or a private investor.  This strategy has worked fine for investors and if you are only making offers on bank REOs on through the MLS, then a cash/MAO offer is really all you will be able to make.

The average number offers to get one accepted with this approach is 20-40 offers to get one accepted in today’s market for most of the country.  Some more experienced investors have been able to reduce that number down to about 5-10 offers to one acceptance by being very selective on what properties to make offers on.  In other words, they know from experience that certain properties from certain banks or listing agents simply will not accept their offers so they don’t even make the offers. 

The secret to success in the real estate business is making offers.  The problem is that most investors use the same offer process when dealing with sellers directly and they are missing some huge opportunities if they just knew how to create alternative offers that don’t require cashing out the seller.

Ask yourself these two questions: Read More...


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